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GM

Honda And GM Cruise Team Up To Develop Autonomous Vehicle

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Honda GM Cruise Autonomous Vehicle

Honda invests in GM Cruise self-driving unit.

Honda, Cruise and General Motors have teamed up to develop a new autonomous vehicle that will serve a variety of uses and be manufactured at a high enough volume to be used globally.

The agreement calls for the Japanese automaker to invest $750 million in Cruise and collaborate with the two companies to develop a purpose-built autonomous vehicle for Cruise, as well as contribute an additional $2 billion to the partnership over the span of 12 years.

In addition to the autonomous vehicle, the three companies will also explore more global opportunities to deploy the Cruise network.

Honda Executive Vice President and Representative Director COO Seiji Kuraishi stated:

“Honda chose to collaborate with Cruise and General Motors based on their leadership in autonomous and electric vehicle technology and our shared vision of a zero-emissions and zero-collision world. We will complement their strengths through our expertise in space efficiency and design to develop the most desirable and effective shared autonomous vehicle.”

GM and Honda previously teamed up to develop a next-generation battery for their future electric vehicles. General Motors Chairman and CEO Mary Barra noted:

“This is the logical next step in General Motors and Honda’s relationship, given our joint work on electric vehicles, and our close integration with Cruise. Together, we can provide Cruise with the world’s best design, engineering and manufacturing expertise, and global reach to establish them as the leader in autonomous vehicle technology – while they move to deploy self-driving vehicles at scale.”

In an era when automotive companies are shacking up left and right as a means of survival, the union between General Motors and Honda is deep and looks to be strengthening by the day.

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Cadillac

New, 2020 Cadillac CT5 Sports Sedan Suits Up To Replace CTS

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New, 2020 Cadillac CT5 Sports Sedan

The CTS replacement has arrived in style.

Cadillac has unveiled the CT5, the successor to the CTS and the brand’s all-new midsize sports sedan.

Design wise, the new CT5 falls in line with Cadillac’s latest design language, featuring a short and wide shield-shaped grille, angular headlights, and vertical LED daytime running lights.

A fastback-like roofline rather than traditional three-box proportions gives the model a more distinctive side profile than the CTS, while thin, vertical taillights make it instantly recognizable as a member of the Cadillac family.

The CT5 rides on an evolution of the critically-acclaimed Alpha platform that underpins the ATS, the CTS, as well as the Chevrolet Camaro. Power will come from one of two engines (you choose): a turbocharged, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, or a twin-turbocharged, 3.0-liter V6.

Rear-wheel drive and a 10-speed automatic transmission come standard, and all-wheel drive will be offered as an option on select models.

Two flavors of the CT5 will be available at launch: Sport and Luxury. The former takes on a more muscular appearance, while the latter goes for elegance instead.

The all-new, 2020 Cadillac CT5 goes on sale in the second half of 2019 after making its world debut at the 2019 New York Auto Show. Are you happy with how it turned out?

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Crossovers

2020 GMC Acadia Refresh Brings Rugged AT4 Model, New Turbo Engine

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Updated, 2020 GMC Acadia Denali SUV, new look

The updates include a more aggressive look, a new turbo four, and a rugged new AT4 model.

GMC has given the Acadia a mid-cycle refresh that brings a revised exterior design, interior and tech enhancements, a new engine option, and an off-road-focused AT4 model.

On the outside, the 2020 GMC Acadia features a bolder grill flanked by rectangular headlights with C-shaped LED inserts, new-look rear lights and nicer 18- and 20-inch wheel designs that brings the overall design in line with GMC’s recent design language.

The interior has been enhanced by an electronic shifter that frees up real estate on the center console for more storage space and an updated infotainment system that the company says is “more intelligent and more intuitive” thanks to a higher-resolution eight-inch touchscreen, an easier to use interface, and improved voice recognition. Wireless charging for your phone is available, as are a head-up display system, a new HD rear camera, and a Rear Camera Mirror that replaces the rear-view mirror with a screen.

A new turbocharged, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine joins the lineup for the 2020 model year and comes standard on the Acadia SLT and Denali models. Mated to a nine-speed automatic transmission, it produces 230 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and 258 pound-feet of torque between 1,500 and 4,000 rpm and uses Active Fuel Management (cylinder deactivation) to maximize fuel-efficiency.

The 2.5L four-cylinder and 310-horsepower, 3.6-liter V6 engines carry over from the 2019 model, with the latter now shifting through the same nine-speed automatic as the new turbo four instead of a six-speed automatic.

In response to the growing demand for rugged vehicles, GMC has expanded the Acadia lineup with a new AT4 model aimed at adventurous buyers. Like the Sierra AT4, the Acadia AT4 looks the part with a trim-specific grille with black chrome accents, plastic body cladding, 17-inch alloy wheels (20-inch alloys are optional), and a sporty dark interior with contrasting accents.

Lastly, the Acadia has received some suspension improvements that help with ride and handling. Front-wheel drive is still standard, while all-wheel drive is optional, though the Acadia AT4 is offered exclusively with all-wheel drive and the V6.

Made in Tennessee, the updated, 2020 GMC Acadia goes on sale in fall 2019. Do you like the changes General Motors made to it?

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Buick

Buick Cascada Convertible Is Dead After 2019, And It Likely Won’t Return

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2019 Buick Cascada Convertible, red

It was virtually invisible, so no one is going to miss it.

Buick has confirmed that the Cascada convertible will be discontinued after the 2019 model year, so act fast if you still want one.

Rumors of the Cascada’s demise began popping up in late 2018 when Opel — which was formerly owned by General Motors — announced plans to stop building its version of the car in Poland. The model had reached the end of its product life cycle, so many questioned its fate.

“The Cascada has played its role in the portfolio perfectly, outselling many other premium convertibles while bringing in [six of every 10] buyers from outside GM,” a Buick spokesperson told . Buick sold about 17,000 examples of the Cascada since adding the model to its portfolio for the 2016 model year, a measly figure that isn’t surprising considering the little advertising its received.

Production ends in the summer of 2019, and with Opel now owned by Peugeot and the convertible segment experiencing a perceptible decline all over the world, the odds of the Cascada being replaced in North America are slim to none.

The Cascada won’t be the only Buick to get the ax in 2019 — the LaCrosse full-size sedan will join it.

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