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Dodge

Breaking! Prius Crushes Challenger SRT Demon In Drag Race

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Prius vs Challenger Demon Drag Race

It wasn’t an ordinarily Toyota Prius that beat the overpowered Dodge Challenger SRT Demon in a drag race…

The driver of an 840-HP Challenger SRT Demon must have felt embarrassed to lose to the “lowest of the low” hybrid, but he can find some solace in the fact that the Prius in question was tuned to make 800 horsepower.

A team from American Racing Headers gave it a new engine, a custom chassis, and a six-speed manual transmission to put it over the edge against the more powerful, 840-hp SRT Demon

Watch the video of the one-sided race from DPC Cars below.

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Chevrolet

12 Second-Tier Classic Muscle Cars To Consider For Your Collection, Part 2

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1970 Pontiac Firebird Formula 400, front

These American classics made a name for themselves in a field dominated by Mustangs and Corvettes.

In Part One of our article on second-tier muscle cars, we looked at six of 12 models that are certainly considered genuine muscle cars but failed to make the waves that some of their bigger-engined brothers did. Here are the remaining six lesser known gems of the muscle car era.

1967 Dodge Coronet RT

1967 Dodge Coronet R/T

The Dodge Coronet R/T was a special model produced to make a statement. While a more domestic version with a 440 CID engine was available, buyers had the option of a monster.

Yes, according to Selma Dodge (Selma, CA), the Dodge Coronet could be optioned with the 426-cid Hemi. Drivetrain options were Mopar’s excellent heavy-duty three-speed TorqueFlite automatic or a four-speed manual.

1964 Mercury Marauder

1964 Mercury Marauder

The Mercury Marauder debuted in the middle of 1963 to take part in the horsepower wars. It was available with the 390, 406, and 427 cubic-inch engines, which could be paired with a 3-speed or 4-speed manual, or a 3-speed automatic.

1968 Chevrolet Biscayne 427

1968 Chevrolet Biscayne 427

The all-new 1965 Biscayne was available with just one engine, a 250 cu in inline-six. That all changed in 1966 when the in-line six became the entry level engine, replaced by the Big-Block 427 cu in V-8 as the top engine.

The high-powered, high-revving 425 hp V8 version with solid lifters proved to be what the doctor ordered.

1965 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1965 Pontiac Catalina 2+2 Sport Coupe

Introduced in 1964, the Pontiac Catalina was 2+2, a full size coupe based on General Motors’ iconic B-body chassis. It sourced its power from a 421 cu in powertrain with dual exhaust, heavy duty front springs, a 3-speed synchromesh manual transmission (a 4-speed with a Hurst shifter came as an option), and a 3.42:1 performance axle ratio.

1970 Pontiac Firebird Formula 400

1970 Pontiac Firebird Formula 400

Built by Pontiac from 1967 to 2002 — yes, it was around for that long — the Firebird was a very capable machine. Two Ram Air 400 cu in engines were available for the 1970 model year: The first was the L74 Ram Air III model (335 HP) and the second was a 345 hp LS1 Ram Air IV (370 HP) that were carried over from 1969.

The 1970 Pontiac Firebird Formula 400 was capable of accelerating from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 6.4 seconds.

1964 Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt

1964 Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt

The Fairlane Thunderbolt introduced in 1964 as a limited production, factory experimental model. A total of 100 units were produced — forty-nine featuring a 4-speed and fifty-one making due with an automatic — which was enough to secure Ford the 1964 NHRA Super Stock title.

The Thunderbolt’s combination of Ford’s light weight, intermediate-sized body with a “high rise” 427 cu in V8 powertrain and dual Holley four-barrel carburetors proved to be a force to be reckoned with in NASCAR.

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Buick

12 Second-Tier Classic Muscle Cars To Consider For Your Collection, Part 1

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AMC Rebel Machine rear

They lurked and even prospered in the shadows of the Mustangs and Corvettes of the world.

During the automotive halcyon days of the late 1960s, there were all sorts of muscle cars being optioned with powerful big-block engines and performance accessories. Not all cars coming out of Detroit were quite so outrageous, though.

There were many smaller-engined cars — typically with small-block V-8s — that were sold by the thousands. Today, they make for great collector cars and you can get one for a fraction of what the big boys go for.

1967 Torino GT Muscle Car

Ford Torino GT

Produced between 1968 and 1976, the Ford Torino was most popular as a 4-door and 2-door hardtop. The high-performance version Torino GT was made with the enthusiast crowd in mind and could be ordered with engines such as the 428 CID and 429 cu “Cobra-Jet.” The GT was also available as a 2-door “SportsRoof” and convertible.

1971 Dodge Demon Classic Car

Dodge Demon

The Demon was introduced in two versions. The first was an econo-car with a 198 CID slant-six and the second was a performance version packing a 340 cubic inch V8. In addition to having more power, the V8 Demon featured special paints and cartoon devil and trident decals.

According to Puente Hills Dodge (City of Industry, CA), the one everyone wanted was the 1971 Demon 340. It was equipped with a synchronized floor-shifted 3-speed manual transmission, all-wheel drum brakes, a Sure-Grip differential and dual exhaust. This particular Demon is still highly sought-after model today.

1966 Ford Mercury Comet Cyclone GT

Mercury Cyclone

In 1964, Ford released a performance version of the Comet called the Mercury Comet Cyclone. That name was used until 1967, when the “Comet” part of the name was dropped and wildly-popular options such as GT, Spoiler and Cobra Jet were added. In 1971, the Cyclone lost its unique identity when it was integrated into the Montego line

Red Buick Wildcat 425ci, front angle view

Buick Wildcat

The full-size Buick Wildcat was produced from 1962 to 1970 and took its name from a fiberglass-bodied 1953 concept car. It had a high-performance 325 hp version of the 401 cu in Nailhead V-8 motor — the “Wildcat 445”, as it was known — and produced 445 lb-ft of torque.

1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst Edition

Chrysler 300 Hurst

In 1970, Chrysler built the “300 Hurst” with input from the uber-popular aftermarket parts manufacturer Hurst Performance. Only 501 units are believed to have been built. Today, genuine 300 Hurst models are worth in the low six-figures.

AMC Rebel Machine

AMC Rebel Machine

In 1957, American Motors Corporation (AMC) introduced a beefy version of the Rambler called the “Rebel.” Powered by a big V-8, the Rambler Rebel was the first factory-produced lightweight muscle car. The Rebel name was eventually used on all performance versions of AMC car, and in 1967, the company’s entire intermediate line took the Rebel name.

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Coupe

Hennessey’s 1,035 HP Dodge Challenger Eats Demons For Lunch

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Dodge Challenger Hellcat Redeye

Just when we thought Dodge’s muscle car couldn’t get any more bonkers…

Renowned American tuner Hennessey has released a tuning package for the Dodge Challenger Hellcat Redeye that makes it more monstrous than its already is.

The so-called HPE1000 package bumps the stock 6.2-liter V8 supercharged engine output to 1,035 horsepower and 948 pound-feet of torque from 797 horsepower and 707 pound-feet. when running on race gas, courtesy of a slew of modifications that includes a 4.5-liter supercharger, a new throttle body, long-tube headers, upgraded fuel injectors, high-flow catalytic converts and an HPE calibration to ensure all of the new components work well together.

The result is a possessed Challenger that devours the Demon for breakfast and a healthy serving of Hellcats or snacks.

Performance specifications have yet to be released; however, Hennessey puts every HPE1000-equipped car on a dyno and tests every Redeye it tunes on public roads for up to 200 miles (322 km).

It also provides buyers with some peace of mind with a one-year, 12,000-mile warranty on the converted cars.

You’ll need around $35,000 to get the HPE1000 package, on top of the price your paid for Challenger Hellcat Redeye, which is priced at $71,350. In other words, adding Hennessey’s modifications places the muscle car’s price above the $100,000.

Worth it?

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